More than a tough Drive…

The physical trip that I wrote about to Wayzohn was interesting and draining, but we had 5 hours with the people of that village that was among the most inspiring of all my experiences in Liberia.

When we arrived just before 11:00am on a Wednesday morning their small church building was absolutely packed with people singing and celebrating our arrival.  I was the recipient of this on my first trip here and it is extremely humbling and moving.  The celebrations take a lot of time and resources from people that don’t have much so we actually told them not to do one for us on this trip.  Still, I’m especially glad that Gordon and David got to experience one.  The people are so genuinely full of joy and inspired by our visit.  And the children just light up when they see a white man…and especially when we pull out our cameras to take their pictures.

The service was brief, but I got to pass on greetings to this remote church from Suncrest and after hearing their choir and congregation do some powerful music in their native Bassa dialect, we closed the service by singing “When we all get to heaven” in English.  I sand that song 1000 times growing up, but David and Gordon agreed…there is nothing like singing it with people from the other side of the world.  And imagining the difference a church like ours could make in a place like this that we will not realize until “we all get to heaven.”  Indescribable.

Then, we went to lunch with a dozen leaders from their church.  This was the most impressive group of Liberians I’ve interacted with.  The group is full of vision for their own church and beyond.  You know you have a special group of people when you learn they planted their church during the war…and have see it grow from 11 people to over 100…all in a church building that is smaller than one of our classrooms.

There is more…but I’ll tell some of the individual stories later.  (And post pictures…just can’t get enough bandwidth to get it done here.)

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~ by Greg Lee on August 7, 2010.

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